Zaha Hadid’s Broad Art Museum

Zaha Hadid's Broad Art Museum in Michigan. Photo by Iwan Baan.
Slide 1
Zaha Hadid's Broad Art Museum in Michigan. Photo by Paul Warchol.
Slide 1
Zaha Hadid's Broad Art Museum in Michigan. Photo by Iwan Baan.
Slide 1
Zaha Hadid's Broad Art Museum in Michigan. Photo by Iwan Baan.
Slide 1
Zaha Hadid's Broad Art Museum in Michigan. Photo by Iwan Baan.
Slide 1
Zaha Hadid's Broad Art Museum in Michigan. Photo by Paul Warchol.
Slide 1
Zaha Hadid's Broad Art Museum in Michigan. Photos by Iwan Baan.

The striking structure at Michigan State University marks the Pritzker Prize–winner’s second project in North America.

With its skin of glass and stainless steel pleats, the museum, which opened earlier this month, draws a sharp contrast to the Gothic architecture that makes up most of the campus in East Lansing. Measuring 4,275 square metres, and rising three storeys, the corrugated structure sits front and centre at the school’s entrance, enticing passersby to explore it. After the Rosenthal Center for Contemporary Art in Cincinnati, completed in 2003, this is Hadid’s second American building.

The $40 million project was spearheaded by MSU alumni and billionaire philanthropists Eli and Edythe Broad, who asked architect Joseph Giovannini to facilitate a competition in 2007. Over four decades, the Broads have amassed a vast collection of prominent post-war and contemporary art from across the globe to create The Broad Art Foundation. In addition to gifts and loans from their personal collection, the Broads contributed $28 million to the project, while the balance was met through fundraising.

Hadid, no stranger to brazen forms that stand out in their surroundings (see her spiky Riverside Museum of Transport in Glasgow and her bow-shaped addition to Antwerp’s Port House), didn’t shy away from creating gravity-defying and angular forms for this project – both inside and out. As in the National Museum of the XXI Century Arts in Rome, she put careful emphasis on the geometries of interconnected spaces. Staircases snake through the museum and jut out at penetrating angles, while entrances lean slightly askew. Also reminiscent of the monolithic museum in Rome, the Broad Art Museum features a palette of black, white, concrete and natural finished wood.

According to the Anderson Economic Group, the museum is expected to attract up to 150,000 annual visitors and grow the regional economy by $5.75 million a year.

The Broad Museum is located on 547 East Circle Dr. in East Lansing, Michigan. 

Comments

  • http://www.facebook.com/norman.mayot Norman Mayot

    There is an excitement here in the angular design and interior form that the ROM in Toronto lacks—perhaps its the careful consideration of exterior materials where the ROM exterior seems like an afterthought. Her work is amazing.

  • junctionist

    Are you kidding me? Toronto’s ROM goes beyond excitement in its impressive angular form. It seems to burst out of the museum’s historic facade. It’s like a dramatic climax. The exterior cladding isn’t what I was expecting at first, but it has grown on me. I’d love to see Zaha Hadid get a Toronto commission because this building looks like it will be spectacular. Too bad about the cheap looking poured concrete plaza in front of it in the renderings, though.

  • junctionist

    I’ve been looking at too many renderings lately. The completed structure is brilliant. But the landscaping relies too much on poured concrete, as is often the case in North American landscape design. Some may see it as the modern material needed to compliment bold contemporary architecture, but after a few years it dulls from white to grey, gets stained, and looks cold and generic.