NYCxDesign: What We Saw and Loved

Daybed and other modern-influenced pieces by Coil + Drift of New York, winners of the ICFF Editors' Award for Best First Time Exhibitor.
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Brooklyn designer Lili Jackson's super-fun Tetra collection of soft, stackable furniture is made of foam encased in a translucent white mesh. Seen at WantedDesign.
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Handcrafted rolling pins and luxury kitchen soap, by Tony Gaudette whose Quebec design studio Milan is devoted to artisanal culinary objects.
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How cute are these Mushi lamps by Andreas Bergsaker of Norway. The removable lid provides a hiding place for small valuables. Part of the exhibition A Few Good Things at WantedDesignNYC.
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Also part of A Few Good Things exhibit of all-things Norwegian were these bird-like Ildhane candleholders by Anderssen & Voll.
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One of New York's latest residential projects to open is architect Bjarke Ingels's mountain-shaped VIA 57 West. The communal deck has views of Midtown to the West and Hudson River to the east.
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A new lounge chair, VIA57, has been designed specifically for the VIA 57 West, made in collaboration with Republic of Fritz Hansen, Danish architect Bjarke Ingels and the Danish design group KiBiSi.
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Another view from inside the newly opened VIA 57 West. A grand stair fills most of the lobby, with banks of mailboxes housed below.
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Retro-mod textiles by Margo Selby of Britain. Spotted at ICFF.
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Nasiri Carpets were stacked in colourful rolls. The handcrafted, flat weave carpets won an ICFF Editors' Award for Best Floor Covering.
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Koncept's N-shaped Mr. No light has morphed into an oval, and into a carryable lantern that can be hung from a tree branch. The product is still in development.
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A stunning and very large chandelier made of Stickbulbs – a flexible light that can be configured and built into almost any geometric shape. Seen at ICFF.
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Mellow, by Paris designer Oceané Delain, for Bernhardt. The sofa's buttons can be adjusted to allow for a softer or harder seat. The concept impressed the ICFF Editors' Award jury who awarded sofa Best in Furniture.
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Fun glass vessels that sit on (and sink into) a bed of nails, by Vanessa Mintari of France. Seen at ICFF.
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A compact kitchen, complete with sink, refrigerator and stove top. The concept, designed by Ana Arana was on view at ICFF.
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Arne Jacobsen's Vola faucet, originally launched in 1968, is now available in any colour you can imagine.
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Three-level coffee table, designed for &Tradition by Jaime Hayon. Called Palette, the table is fabricated in brass, red Rosso Levanto marble, and blue stained ash.
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Emeco is branching out from chairs to tables. Run was the feature product for the U.S. firm at ICFF, designed by Sam Hecht and Kim Colin.
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Edge faucets look a bit like cartoon-drawings in 3-D. Seen at the Franz Viegener booth at ICFF.
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Build your own tree light by Curio Design. Called Splyt, the firm is now taking orders for delivery in the fall.
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At the Foscarini showroom, Ferruccio Laviani's stunning installation – Reality or illusion, Giants is a state of mind – created wonderful distorting effects.
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Blackbody's Greene Street showroom was a constellation of light with thousands of the French company's OLED lights covering the ceiling.
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A table lamp that uses sheets of gold-coloured paper to diffuse light. By German lighting genius Ingo Maurer, on view at his Greene Street store.
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Pastel-hued stools made of concrete, by New York studio Mmaterial. On view at Sight Unseen Offsite, inside the Grace Building on Avenue of the Americas.
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Metallic pendants by Toronto studio Shelter Bay Goods can be mixed and matched in hundreds of combinations. Seen at Sight Unseen Offsite.
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British lighting designer Lee Broom opened his first North American shop, for a one-month stint, at 63 Greene St. Or, as the designer likes to call the shop, Broom off Broome. The store is open until June 10.
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Pastel-glowing wall lights by Spanish lighting company Marset. Seen at ICFF.
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A temporary double-height room by Molo Design of Vancouver. Installed at one end of the ICFF show floor, the room is made entirely out of paper.
Daybed and other modern-influenced pieces by Coil + Drift of New York, winners of the ICFF Editors' Award for Best First Time Exhibitor.
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North America’s biggest furniture and design event was chock-full of budding talents, local makers and major brands – at ICFF as well as at dozens of off-site exhibits located throughout the city. Here’s what caught our eye, from Greene Street to Brooklyn.

Like all good furniture fairs, the main event and off-site exhibitions complement each other’s strengths. ICFF, held at the Javits Centre from May 21 to 24, is a one-stop location for gauging the market’s mood and figuring out which way trends are going in North America, as well as overseas.

Among such familiar brands as Artifort, &Tradition and Emeco filling the booths at ICFF, there was also a noticeable wave of makers, mostly from Brooklyn, producing exquisitely crafted furniture pieces out of locally sourced materials, including repurposed wood and raw steel. The maker trend has been happening for a while, but the groundswell has reached a higher pitch, with artistry that can’t be ignored.

Studios like Coil + Drift and Stefan Rurak, both exhibitions at the main fair, are developing signature styles and excellent detailing. Brendan Ravenhill Studio of L.A. was this year’s winner of the ICFF Editors’ Award for Best Body of Work, an award that in previous years has gone to more firmly established manufacturers. Meanwhile, Coil + Drift of New York got a nod, winning the Best First Time Exhibitor award.

While boutique studios were at ICFF, the next generation of designers was on view at some of the week’s premiere off-site events, namely, WantedDesign and Sight Unseen Offsite – two group shows that have become essential for scouting young talent. It’s impossible not to be energized by the level of experimentation in materials and processes happening, with the new lust for entrepreneurialism and crowd-sourced financing. Many designers at Sight Unseen were set up to either sell their wares on the spot or online. And, indeed, going online to check them out, it’s clear business plans are taking shape.

Here are 30 great moments we captured while crawling the exhibit halls and showrooms all week long.

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