fbpx
We rely on advertising revenue to support the creative content on our site. Please consider whitelisting our site in your settings, or pausing your adblocker while stopping by.

Get the Magazine

The Setting

There is a slight smell of forest in the air in Stockholm’s Hagastaden district, where mass timber high-rises are gradually reaching full height and welcoming their first residents. As part of the neighbourhood’s ongoing evolution, the city has been working with developers to reimagine the formerly industrial street Norra Stationsgatan as a kind of cultural corridor lined with architecturally striking pavilions. Commissioned to lead one of these projects, Stockholm real estate development firm Humlegården Fastigheter set out to create a destination dining spot: Rummel restaurant.

A dining area in Stockholm restaurant Rummel featuring a curved long banquette that wraps around two circular black dining tables. The walls feature wood columns and cork paneling, with windows looking outside to the snowy city.
The Brief

In line with local planning regulations, the developer was given a wedge-shaped site for a building that had to transition from one to two storeys. Humlegården Fastigheter turned to Copenhagen-based architecture studio — and timber specialists — Henning Larsen, who responded with a proposal for a continuous sloping roof. “We wanted to create a very long, narrow space; on one end, low and intimate, and on the other, almost a lofty cathedral,” says Per Ebbe Hansson, the firm’s lead design architect.

A view of the sloped pavilion that Stockholm restaurant Rummel is located inside of, shown in the winter when the ground is covered in snow. A tall narrow end with almost floor-to-ceiling glazing slopes downwards to a wider shorter side.
The double-frame structure changes the height and width of its beams as it moves from east to west, shifting from 10 metres tall at one end to four metres at the other.
An interior view of Stockholm restaurant Rummel showing a row of black circular dining tables inside of tall, cathedral-like space lined in wood with hanging brass pendant lamps.
High-efficiency glass minimizes solar gain, while cork paneling helps to mitigate noise. Since the pavilion is heavily shadowed, sunlight doesn’t bother the guests.
The Design

The result, a slanted building with a burnt-wood exterior and glulam frame, features floor-to-ceiling glazing that builds to a narrow eight-metre-tall window on the pavilion’s western end. On the eastern side, the proportions are reversed, with a gable width of eight metres and a height equal to the width of the western window.

The gentle downward movement and sideways stretching that emerges from the transition between these two ends creates a space that’s part holy temple, part stranded (but stately) ship. While the pavilion is permanent, Henning Larsen performed a life cycle analysis to make sure that its materials could someday be disassembled and re-used if need be. “We made all the screws visible,” says Hansson. “Even just for maintenance reasons, it makes it easy to access.”

An interior view of Stockholm restaurant Rummel showing a row of black square dining tables in a tall wooden room.
A closeup of a black steel staircase positioned in front of cork wall paneling.
The Details

Once plans for the overall structure were in place, Humlegården reached out to Stockholm restaurateurs Christopher Ellertsson and Robin Moderato, who in turn tapped architecture studio Millimeter Arkitekter to create the warm dining ambience that now defines their restaurant, Rummel. “We decided to work a lot with textures and colouring in creative ways, keeping in mind the lack of solid walls,” says interior architect Filip Berglund, pointing to elements finished in red marble, polished brass and padded olive-green leather.

Other features — like lighting brackets mounted to the ceiling beams and server stations placed between the wall columns — highlight the surrounding architecture.

A nighttime view of the bar at Stockholm restaurant Rummel, with wine glasses hanging from black steel shelving suspended from the ceiling.
The Scene

In addition to its spiritual dining room and more blingy bar, Rummel also includes a downstairs area for Stockholm diners craving a more intimate experience. Ellertsson has noticed that returning guests tend to move around the space between visits. “If they sat in the ‘cathedral’ last time, they may want to sit in the bar area next,” he says. In a neighbourhood under transformation — and a building that already anticipates its next life — it’s only natural to want to change it up.

Stockholm’s Rummel Welcomes Diners Into a Sloped Pavilion

Designed for future disassembly, a glulam pavilion by Henning Larsen offers up a taste of woodland magic.

We rely on advertising revenue to support the creative content on our site. Please consider whitelisting our site in your settings, or pausing your adblocker while stopping by.