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264
Current Issue

June 2018

#264
June 2018

Discover why privacy zones are prevailing in contemporary offices, see how a former boiler house became a cutting-edge atelier in the Netherlands and visit one Vancouver architect’s super-efficient backyard studio.

In true summer-house fashion, Pilot Coffee Roasters’ seasonal pop-up in Ontario’s Prince Edward County distills the burgeoning espresso empire’s primary outlets into a smaller version that opens up to the great outdoors.

Credit Williamson Williamson for the skillful downsizing. Back in 2013, Pilot co-founders Jessie and Andy Wilkin enlisted the architecture studio – then Williamson Chong – to create their roastery’s Toronto headquarters. Since then, the firm has designed two more coffee shops for Pilot and has another in the works.

Although the pop-upu2019s smaller footprint necessitated a more linear counter than the sinuous ones in Pilotu2019s permanent cafu00e9s, one corner is curved to keep with tradition and to subtly lead customersu2019 eyes to the steel condiment shelf.

For the company’s cottage-country outpost, the architects drew design elements from previous Pilot locations. “We were following a natural train of thought,” co-principal Betsy Williamson says. The pop-up’s counter, for instance, is lined in the same white-oak pickets that grace the signature curvier bars in Pilot’s urban cafés. Behind it, minimalist Modbar espresso taps are operated via under-counter control modules tucked next to a fridge and an ice machine, with power and water supplied through hookups to a nearby ice cream shop.

Hydraulic lifts enable two sides of the container to be raised and propped into place by pull-down legs, providing shade and shelter from rain.

To house it all, a 2.4-by-6.1-metre corrugated metal container constituted the perfect pre-made shell. “Sometimes, you work to mask the toughness of a shipping container,” Williamson says. “In this case, we really wanted it for what it is: It keeps things secure, and it keeps them dry.”

This story was taken from the June 2018 issue of Azure. Buy a copy of the issue here, or subscribe here.

AZURE is an independent magazine working to bring you the best in design, architecture and interiors. We rely on advertising revenue to support the creative content on our site. Please consider whitelisting our site in your settings, or pausing your adblocker while stopping by.