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On September 28, 1985, Metropolitan Police entered the home of Dorothy “Cherry” Groce, a Black mother of six, in London’s Brixton neighbourhood and subsequently shot her in the shoulder. Protests broke out immediately following the attack, which left the 37-year-old paralyzed from the chest down. Groce died in 2011 of health issues that resulted from her injury. It’s this personal and political history — of her perseverance and the community’s activism in the face of injustice — that David Adjaye’s monolithic Cherry Groce Memorial Pavilion honours and continues into the future.

Grounded by a thickset tiered triangular base with integrated seating and inscribed with a dedication, the folly-like edifice is given prominence in...

In Brixton, a Sculptural Monument to Cherry Groce

David Adjaye’s powerful memorial honours a victim of police violence.

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