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Junya Ishigama on the cover of the October 2019 issue of Azure Magazine. The Innovators Issue.
Current Issue

October 2019

#275
October 2019

The Innovators Issue: Junya Ishigama's genre-busting architecture, Sidewalk Labs and the future of the city, and more!

Algae is considered one of the most promising sources of renewable plastics. This dried algae is from Algix of Mississippi, which combines fish farming and algae biomass production.
comprise the second instalment of our annual trends package, which explores the colours and materials that will take centre stage in the coming year. (See our first instalment on metallics.)

Exploration never goes out of style, but it does change course. Designers are looking at novel and reusable materials such as algae and ocean debris to bring less harm to the environment.

1 Rush Chair
Christopher Jenner’s limited edition chair was rendered by computer but handwoven in a rush weave by Felicity Irons, one of the last remaining masters of the art. galleryfumi.com

 

2 The Bic Cristal Structure
As part of a symposium on spatial structures, international firm AAU Anastas created a mesmerizing canopy using 10,000 Bic pens. aauanastas.com

 

3 Overgrown
A brass chandelier is coated with minerals that grow slowly, over time. It is one in a series by Mark Sturkenboom, who is fascinated by what would happen to the world after an apocalyptic natural disaster. marksturkenboom.com

 

4 Mmaterial
New York designer Fernando Mastrangelo’s cement drums are cast in such pale hues as blush pink and slate blue. An exhibition of his latest is on view at The New gallery in L.A. until November 30. m-material.com

 

5 AdidasxPARLEY for the Oceans
Adidas’s 3-D-printed Ocean Plastic shoe is made from discarded fishing nets and ocean trash. adidas-group.com

 

 

6 Edible Water Bottle
Iceland design student Ari Jónsson’s alternative to making water bottles with plastic is to make them with agar, a biodegradable powder made from edible red algae.

 

AZURE is an independent magazine working to bring you the best in design, architecture and interiors. We rely on advertising revenue to support the creative content on our site. Please consider whitelisting our site in your settings, or pausing your adblocker while stopping by.