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AZURE - June 2019 - The Workspace Issue - Cover

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Five Minutes with Ron Gilad 01

Azure: Let’s talk about Linea Delta, this year’s addition to the La Linea series.

Ron Gilad: Continuing with a design that extracts the essence of the very traditional candelabra, Linea Delta has actually been developed to fit American commercial regulations, which require a wall sconce not to exceed 12.5 centimetres from the wall. So, if a blind person is walking along a corridor, Linea Delta would not be an obstruction.

AZ: Would you say it’s more difficult, or restricting, to design according to North American standards?

RG: With Linea Delta, I was limited by depth in the way I was able to play with the design in a poetic way, but still stay within the restrictions. I think that every country – the U.S., Japan, Italy – has different regulations. It’s the level of safety that is the issue. Let’s just say the Europeans are a little more easy going – in regards to commercial spaces, not residential.

AZ: Where did the concept for Wallpiercing (first introduced at Salone 2010) come from?

RG: Two years ago, Flos presented me with the concept of Soft Architecture, which is a combination of two technologies – the LED and the material. SA is a product specified by the architect, and not the end-user, so it needs to be encapsulated with the architecture in the planning stages.

I was trying to be a little ironic with my approach to the concept, so the first thing that came to my mind was to explore how soft is soft. So I said, “Hmm, in this case I need to throw things at the wall and see how it will react.” It started in my studio; I started throwing knives into the wall and observed how they stuck. And then I started thinking about how the knife could contain light in it. And then right away I came up with the idea of a flying saucer that is basically being thrown into the wall at a certain angle. So it didn’t start from the place of a traditional body piercing, but from throwing something at the wall and seeing how it will react to the power that has been projected on it.

AZ: Can you talk about the smaller version of Wallpiercing, introduced this year at Euroluce?

RG: It’s still part of the Soft Architecture concept. With this version, the ring has not been inserted into the wall, enabling us to create a full ring of light that is connected to the electricity box which is basically a hinge that you can rotate and install at any angle you want.

AZ: What’s a typical day for Ron Gilad?

GD: I never let myself become overwhelmed with work – I’m quite lazy. I am in front of my desk for 18 hours a day, but I would say most of that time is spent staring out the window and daydreaming. And I always sketch – I don’t know how to work on the computer. It’s a very important tool in order to help you design, but drawing and model-making are the best practices for me.

 

AZURE is an independent magazine working to bring you the best in design, architecture and interiors. We rely on advertising revenue to support the creative content on our site. Please consider whitelisting our site in your settings, or pausing your adblocker while stopping by.