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Junya Ishigama on the cover of the October 2019 issue of Azure Magazine. The Innovators Issue.
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October 2019

#275
October 2019

The Innovators Issue: Junya Ishigama's genre-busting architecture, Sidewalk Labs and the future of the city, and more!

I-Table, Kartell’s new induction table designed by Piero Lissoni, offers a surface for both work and cooking – at the same time.

“A table with a hidden function – nothing more, nothing less. And it doesn’t want to be a kitchen,” says Milan designer Piero Lissoni of his minimalist I-Table for Kartell, which integrates an induction device underneath a glass surface. Featuring an oval or rectangular top in black or white and a steel base, the table is meant to be used like any other, but it also happens to serve a second function when plugged in. The prototype is previewed in Kartell’s 2018 collection, which, with its message of effortlessness, marks a departure for the Italian brand and its predominant focus on plastic furniture. Promoted under the umbrella of “smart design for smart people,” its latest line offers new material explorations as well as, in the brand’s own words, “new ways of living and sharing spaces.”

For its part, the I-Table is pretty cool. As most people are now aware, induction cooktops use an electromagnetic field to transfer current directly to cookware (to test the compatibility of stainless steel pots and pans, simply stick a magnet to the bottom and gauge how strongly it adheres). This causes the cookware and its contents to heat up while the stovetop stays relatively neutral – the pot itself will radiate some heat back onto the cooktop, but this dissipates quickly, just as it would from any countertop. So worry not about leaving the element on and burning yourself – or in the case of I-Table, your laptop. The sleek, non-techy design allows either work or cooking to take precedence, whether you can’t tear yourself away from a spreadsheet to put that kettle on or you need to constantly consult Epicurious while making spaghetti Bolognese.

This story was taken from the September 2018 issue of Azure. Buy a copy of the issue here, or subscribe here.

AZURE is an independent magazine working to bring you the best in design, architecture and interiors. We rely on advertising revenue to support the creative content on our site. Please consider whitelisting our site in your settings, or pausing your adblocker while stopping by.