Living in technicolour

Living in technicolour
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Living in technicolour
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Living in technicolour
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Living in technicolour
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Living in technicolour
Living in technicolour
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For a Montreal loft, architect Jean Verville has unleashed a full spectrum of possibilities.

Since the client is an avid art collector, Verville began the process of designing the interior with an artwork of his own. Using five pencil crayons in the owner’s favourite colours, the architect sketched out the 130-square-metre layout. The floor alone must have caused him to wear the pencils’ down to their nubs.

Made of painted vinyl – with hues conceived by an artist friend – and covered in a layer of clear epoxy, the floor represents the ultimate exercise in colour-blocking. Against the raw concrete shell and the exposed duct work, the bursts of colour provide a brilliant contrast. While some of the cabinetry is starkly white, many of the walls and millwork are also lacquered in specially devised pigments. These form as backdrops for artworks, as well as brightly hued iconic designs, like Eero Aarnio‘s Tomato chair in apple green and his Pony chair in bright orange. Other sculptural furnishings include The Other One sofa, in gradients of blue, by Leif Joergensen for Danish manufacturer Hay.

Perhaps the best furnishing is a built-in created specially for the interior: a yellow bed, made of wood topped in leather-upholstered foam padding. It smartly conceals a multiplicity of storage.

Verville just opened his practice. He’s planning a trip to Japan, in which he’ll research a new residential concept. If this interior is any indication, his future oeuvre will be bright, beautiful and original.

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