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Azure's July/August 2019 Issue cover
Current Issue

July/August 2019

#273
July/August 2019

From a groundbreaking seaside museum in China to an elegant new sofa by Ronan and Erwan Bouroullec, Azure’s July/August issue unveils the 20 winners of the ninth annual AZ Awards!

 

1 Camille Walala
For a short-lived movement that embraced the anarchic fusion of bold patterns, geometric shapes, DayGlo colours and synthetic materials, the Memphis style sure has legs. These days, the list of designers who claim the 1980s aesthetic as a key influence on their work includes everyone from Studio Job to Dusen Dusen.

One of its most unabashed heirs is London designer Camille Walala, whose installations and interiors (including last summer’s Memphis-inspired maze at London’s Now Gallery) are appropriately unruly, mixing eye-popping stripes and squiggles with tribal and other global prints.

 

2 Wronko Woods
It’s a testament to the Memphis school’s universal appeal that even a Canadian studio known for its handcrafted, mostly wood furnishings would find inspiration in its po-mo theatricality. Showcased at IDS Vancouver last fall, the Memphis collection of furniture and objects by Carson Wronko of Edmonton downplays the bright shades and plasticity of its forebear in favour of quiter tones and natural materials such as bleached maple and blackened walnut.

But the whimsy and sculpturality are extant in pieces such as the cabinet (pictured) featuring udder-like legs and graphic surface symbols.

 

3 Bibo Ergo Sum
One of the buzziest commercial interiors to gain attention of late is the L.A. bar Bibo Ergo Sum, where Oliver Haslegrave of Brooklyn-based Home Studios juxtaposed soft-pink rolled upholstery and tubular lighting with curvy booths and doorways to create a look that he calls “Memphis meets Secession.”

The result is strangely cohesive, familiar yet fresh – and just the kind of rule-breaking space that Memphis founder Ettore Sottsass would have enjoyed.

This story was taken from the March/April 2018 issue of Azure. Buy a copy of the issue here, or subscribe here.

AZURE is an independent magazine working to bring you the best in design, architecture and interiors. We rely on advertising revenue to support the creative content on our site. Please consider whitelisting our site in your settings, or pausing your adblocker while stopping by.