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When Nendo was called upon to design a digital hub for an international firm in Tokyo, the Japanese firm came up with the idea of zooming in on the zeroes and ones that make up computer code. It then moulded this basic digital DNA onto an anything-but-basic physical element: transparent glass partitions that incorporate those numeric figures in its wavy form.

A close-up of the ripple effect at Nendo McKinsey Tokyo

These walls are composed of two glass layers (eight millimetres and six millimetres thick, respectively) with four sheets of shatterproof film sandwiched between them. Placed on a stainless-steel mould, the glass plate was heated to make it malleable in order to apply the binary pattern. From afar, the surface seems sinuous and organic. Up close, the digital motif reveals itself. Because of their voluptuous surface, the glass partitions could not be suction-cupped into position and the use of manual labour made this interior design project and arduous and time-consuming undertaking.

A view of the sitting area at Nendo McKinsey Tokyo

The result is worth it, though. The glass walls, which enclose conference rooms and delineate various zones, provide the tandem functions of privacy and transparency – both much valued in office settings – while also presenting a marvellous eye-catching effect. The shapeliness of the walls, especially when perceived in contrast to the herringbone-wood floors and the all-black seating and desking systems, adds surprise and elegance. The partitions reflect and refract light, and dapple it onto the floor, evoking a frozen waterfall.

In Tokyo, Nendo have used binary code to create a space that contains multitudes.

Nendo Unveils a Sleek-as-Ice Tokyo Office

Nendo’s interior design for an international firm is centred around a sculptural glass enclosures inspired by digital DNA.

AZURE is an independent magazine working to bring you the best in design, architecture and interiors. We rely on advertising revenue to support the creative content on our site. Please consider whitelisting our site in your settings, or pausing your adblocker while stopping by.