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January/February 2019

#269
January/February 2019

A vibrantly hued getaway in Portugal. Architect Omar Gandhi’s latest coastal marvel in Nova Scotia. The circular condo complex redefining Winnipeg’s landscape.

Christian Sieger explains how his family firm’s diminutive spa – the Small Size Premium Spa – promotes an outsized sense of wellness.

How much space do we actually need? It’s a question that Germany’s Sieger Design has been grappling with in recent years, especially when it comes to the demands placed on bathroom design as part of overall living space. Its solution, refined over time: a fully kitted-out spa and bathroom of just six square metres.

Founded by Dieter Sieger in 1964, the multidisciplinary studio is now helmed by his sons, Christian and Michael. Recently, Christian shared how increasingly small urban living spaces and a desire to make wellness a part of daily life propelled the development of the studio’s Small Size Premium Spa (SSPS), which currently has three versions that can be customized through materials, lighting, sound and even scent.

Christian Sieger on: Doing more with less…

“A greater concentration of people living in cities means we have to share less space. We challenged ourselves to show how small a spa could be without losing its benefits. First, we took the bathtub out. It’s a dead area, and people aren’t making the time to use it anymore. We then split the six-square-metre room into a dry area and a wet area, moving away from the conventional layout that places everything against the walls, which wastes a lot of central space. SSPS is about maximizing spa quality while taking away the fear that something so small is clumsy or unusable. Of course, if a bathtub is wanted, one can easily be integrated into the design and fit with a cover that turns it into a seat.”

…The importance of emotional support…

“In recent years, people have become more aware that the quality of their bathroom can bring quality to their life. It’s not simply a room for functionality; it’s a room to regenerate and recharge. The atmosphere of this room can greatly influence daily life. Today we understand the need for the right amount of sleep, but we also need the right emotional set-up to start the day and a place to calm down before bed. The bathroom is the room to do this.”

…Prevention as the best medicine

“Since having a strong relationship with the bathroom can help with well-being, we incorporate water therapy – which helps with blood circulation among other things – through elements like horizontal showers. We also use lighting and reflected images to simulate sunrises and sunsets. Too often we wait until we are sick before taking care of our-selves, so including a private spa at home can be a preventative investment. It’s about the quality of personal life.”

Making the most of their compact footprints, the adaptable units feature vertical, horizontal and/or sit-down showers.

This story was taken from the January/February 2019 issue of Azure. Buy a copy of the issue here, or subscribe here.

AZURE is an independent magazine working to bring you the best in design, architecture and interiors. We rely on advertising revenue to support the creative content on our site. Please consider whitelisting our site in your settings, or pausing your adblocker while stopping by.