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274
Current Issue

September 2019

#274
September 2019

Interior High Notes: Residential wonders in Atlanta, Whistler, Milan and more in Azure's September 2019 issue!

Kew, an upscale neighbourhood on the outskirts of Melbourne, is a bit of an architectural mishmash – an array of “McMansions and mock Georgian townhouses,” as local architect Andrew Maynard describes it. But there are also several historic homes in the nabe – including century-old Edwardian, Federation and Victorian homes – and it was these Maynard chose to respond to when tasked with building a new home in the area.

Maynard’s clients were in search of a design that could accommodate their growing family’s long-term needs – a place to call home for at least the next quarter-century. It would need to be not only a place for their children to grow up, but also a place where their aging parents might comfortably come to live in a few years’ time.

The exterior character of the building, dubbed Charles, was somewhat predetermined; the site required the use of stone cladding – no modern material interventions amidst a sea of brick, stone and tile. Inspired by the lichen-covered slate roofs on some of the heritage homes in the area, Maynard chose dark shale tiles for the main facade material. In a contemporary twist, it appears in an unusual variety of patterns that define each of the volumes that make up the house. In alternating square, rectangular, diamond and fish-scale patterns, these tiles demarcate the division of interior space from the outside, and even dip into the interior, in the passageways between volumes, including indoor/outdoor stairways, bridges and glass-walled hallways.

The house’s individual volumes offer plenty of shared and private space for the multi-generational residents, with these connecting features acting as a buffer between, for instance, the granny suite and the children’s rooms. The indoor/outdoor nature of these interstitial spaces also helps bring light into the interiors, as do the floor-to-ceiling windows that open up to extend the living space into the yard.

Be sure to check out Azure‘s June issue for more projects with awe-inspiring facades, as well as the latest in cladding products.

AZURE is an independent magazine working to bring you the best in design, architecture and interiors. We rely on advertising revenue to support the creative content on our site. Please consider whitelisting our site in your settings, or pausing your adblocker while stopping by.