We rely on advertising revenue to support the creative content on our site. Please consider whitelisting our site in your settings, or pausing your adblocker while stopping by.

Get the Magazine

Best of Spring 2021
From primordial inspiration to sage-green style, these are some our favourite new designs this season.
5 New Furnishings Embracing Sage Tones
1/4
Marco Lavit’s Lemni Chair was Made to Last
2/4
These Prehistoric-Inspired Tables are Braving the Elements
3/4
Sabine Marcelis’s Boa Pouffe is a Feat of Upholstery
4/4
Best of Spring 2021
Best of Spring 2021

Perhaps it’s a sign of the times, but a distinctly subdued palette is defining the latest crop of furnishings the world over. While this inclination is no doubt related to the abrupt global halt experienced during the early months of the pandemic, it’s also indicative of a larger shift in the landscape of contemporary design. In products ranging from sartorial partitions to graphic rugs and modular seating systems, designers are eschewing passing statements in favour of flexible keepsakes — ones that, like the sage hues that adorn them, only get better with age. As Magis says of its latest release, Costume by Stefan Diez, these epochal yet adaptable offerings are at once “transformable and pragmatic.”

1
Costume

Modular....

Architect Marco Lavit is no stranger to furniture design — take, for instance, the wealth of singular pieces he has completed for high-profile galleries like Milan’s Nilufar. His latest work, the Lemni chair for Living Divani, however, is an exception to this “collectibles only” rule. The designer’s first commercial product, the chair is composed of four semicircles rotated to form both the seat and the base; the resulting structure creates the lemniscate curve (or infinity sign) that gives the object its name. In addition to exhibiting a different profile from each angle, Lemni provides the comfort and casual cool of a hammock with the appeal of a timeless showpiece. Azure caught up with Lavit to learn more about how this sleek,...

1
Rio Ipanema

Taking its cues (and moniker) from Brazil’s rich history of modernism, Roche Bobois’s fittingly named Rio Ipanema end table boasts a robust carved solid oak base that balances an 85-centimetre-wide lacquered MDF and leather dishlike surface. Bruno Moinard’s 41.1-centimetre-tall design was also conceived with a series of companion pieces — a sideboard and dining tables — to complete a vignette.

2
Clemo

Available in three diameters (49, 90 and 120 centimetres) and three heights (49, 31.5 and 28 centimetres), this trio of coffee tables by Massimo Castagna for Gallotti&Radice embraces primal shapes to striking effect.

Their graphic profiles are accented by the finish options, including...

When Hem founder Petrus Palmér came across an image of a one-off doughnut-shaped seat on Sabine Marcelis’s Instagram account, he instantly knew it had to be part of his furniture company’s portfolio. A short exchange later, a new collaboration with the Dutch designer was born. “I saw this as a great opportunity to work with a brand that has extensive knowledge of upholstered objects,” Marcelis says, “[and] to bring the shape to life in fabric in a completely seamless way.”

It took two years of development to perfect the seamless upholstery of Sabine Marcelis’s Boa.

Marcelis is well-known for her evocative handling of resin and glass. And the creation of the Boa pouffe, her inaugural soft furnishing, was far more...