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At Falafel Yoni, a renovated Montreal eatery designed by architect David Dworkind, a communal rolled-steel sink serves as a handy centrepiece.

Stuffed pita is a dish best served to clean hands. Enter new Montreal restaurant Falafel Yoni’s playful centrepiece: a sculptural communal wash basin ready to cleanse grubby paws – and to rinse away what little tahini sauce diners haven’t already licked off their fingers at the end of their meal.

“My plan with the owners was to invest in one fun focal element – the rolled-steel sink – and then keep the rest fairly simple and affordable,” says architect David Dworkind, who cut his teeth designing stark but brash residences at the Montreal firm Naturehumaine.

To unify the various ceiling heights, oriented strand board panels became a series of baffles. They accent a new central bulkhead installed to consolidate plumbing, wiring and lighting.

While it may look straightforward, Dworkind’s pared-back scheme for the 88-square-metre space in fact grapples with several complex challenges, from a zoning restriction that limited the number of seats to just 12 to an uneven ceiling. “There were all of these different bulkheads left behind from years of bad renovations,” he says. “The place had plumbing and electrical going every which way.”

Dworkind used red asphalt roofing sheets to line the base of the restaurantu2019s eat-at counter, configured into a W shape. Terrazzo flooring underfoot is the lone remaining element of the spaceu2019s former life as a cafu00e9.

To keep to the project’s tight budget, Dworkind found his solutions to both problems in off-the-shelf materials. “A lot of ideas came together on Home Depot runs,” he says. “I just went looking for things with texture that I could work to really accentuate the beauty.” His hands-on approach paid off: Using steel, wood panels and corrugated roofing sheets, the architect successfully elevated low-cost fare into a gourmet experience.

This story was taken from the October 2018 issue of Azure. Buy a copy of the issue here, or subscribe here.

AZURE is an independent magazine working to bring you the best in design, architecture and interiors. We rely on advertising revenue to support the creative content on our site. Please consider whitelisting our site in your settings, or pausing your adblocker while stopping by.