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267
Current Issue

October 2018

#267
October 2018

From oversized volumes and rounded forms to fluid metal mesh and prismatic surfaces, AZURE’s October issue examines the concepts, materials and processes promising to redefine our spaces over the coming 12 months and beyond.

Multi-purpose zones and an atmospheric palette make Francesc Rifé studio’s Avianca airport VIP lounge first class in every sense.

Airports are chaotic places. So when passengers seek refuge in a lounge, the top thing they crave is a sense of order and quiet. This desire is perfectly in tune with the principles of Spanish designer Francesc Rifé, who has made order, symmetry and proportion the trademarks of his practice. When called in to design the Colombian national airline’s new flagship VIP Lounge at El Dorado International Airport in Bogotá, Rifé exercised precision and applied a relaxing palette to create an oasis that mixes comfort and entertainment.

Encompassing 3,500 square metres, Avianca’s lounge could have felt cavernous. To counter this effect, Rifé organized areas to meet the various needs of both business- and first-class travellers, the purpose of each space identified with a name such as “Stay Connected,” “Resting Area” or “Enjoy Your Meal.” The approach eschews the traditional concept of lounges as places to merely sit and wait. Instead, Avianca’s fosters myriad experiences – passengers can sequester themselves in a quiet area or socialize in open zones, depending on their mood.

With seating for just over 50, u201cFeel at Homeu201d is the largest area for waiting and relaxing. The Bud armchairs are by Francesc Rifu00e9 Studio for Carmenes.

Keeping in mind such airport-imposed restrictions as ceiling height and general lighting levels, Rifé incorporated a series of “micro architectures” within which he could play more freely with proportions and illumination. For example, he designed towering auxiliary standing lamps whose metal structures hold aloft canopies of light and mimic the form of a local tree species. For seating, Rifé mixed custom pieces with ones drawn from his portfolio for Spanish brands Carmenes and Capdell. He also included furniture by Claesson Koivisto Rune and Jorge Pensi and lighting by Ramos & Bassols.

The bar area (or u201cHave a Drinku201d) features both lounge chairs and bar stools. Grey walls and floors maintain a tranquil vibe.

Colombia itself inspired the palette, which is dominated by a soft grey that evokes an indigenous stone. Introduced through carpet and ceramic floor tiles, the soothing tone is enlivened with hits of inky black and warm walnut that help create a dramatic aesthetic without feeling ominous. In a further nod to the region, caña flecha – a species of tall grass used to make traditional sombreros – was fashioned into sound-absorbing panels.

This story was taken from the October 2018 issue of Azure. Buy a copy of the issue here, or subscribe here.

AZURE is an independent magazine working to bring you the best in design, architecture and interiors. We rely on advertising revenue to support the creative content on our site. Please consider whitelisting our site in your settings, or pausing your adblocker while stopping by.