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When it was first erected in 1767, Paris’s Bourse de Commerce was a bustling commercial hub trading in grain and goods shipped in from France’s agrarian hinterlands. Over the centuries, it evolved into a modern-day stock exchange, and with this transition, the building — a circular neoclassical edifice capped with a dome Victor Hugo once described as an enormous English jockey’s cap — transformed, too. In the late 1800s, the structure was refurbished and an elaborate allegorical fresco by five artists depicting a glorified chronicle of France’s colonial history came to adorn the soaring cupola.

Urs Fischer’s wax replica of The Rape of the Sabine Women anchors the cast-in-place concrete cylinder in the central exhibition...
Tadao Ando Revives Paris’ Iconic Bourse de Commerce

The former commercial hub turns contemporary art mecca thanks to a subtle yet striking intervention by the Japanese architect.

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