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Azure's July/August 2019 Issue cover
Current Issue

July/August 2019

#273
July/August 2019

From a groundbreaking seaside museum in China to an elegant new sofa by Ronan and Erwan Bouroullec, Azure’s July/August issue unveils the 20 winners of the ninth annual AZ Awards!

The Portable Kitchen Hood

While oversized extraction hoods can make a statement in kitchens, not all spaces are able to accommodate them. Enter Maxime Augay’s pint-sized portable version. Intent on solving problems using a minimalist approach, the product designer presented the clever contraption as his master’s graduation project while at ÉCAL (it also earned Augay the Pure Talents Contest award in the Living Kitchen category at IMM Cologne this year). Wanting to develop a new typology of kitchen appliance, Augay managed to fit a small yet powerful motor inside a compact stainless-steel casing. Placed directly next to a pan, the hood draws smoke and odours through two filters. The first collects oils and fats, while the second, a charcoal filter, purifies the air before recycling it back into the room; both are removable and dishwasher-safe. An integrated handle lets the apparatus hang on a hook when not in use. maximeaugay.com  

Ordine

When it comes to freeing up space in the kitchen, the stovetop is typically a non-starter – if one wants to cook, one requires a stovetop. Turin studio Adriano Design, however, has created a version with legs – literally: Ordine, conceived for the Italian manufacturer Fabita, is a small-scale induction system that can be hung out of the way once dinner has been served. Essentially a deconstructed cooking surface, its two circular glass-ceramic heating elements are affixed to a wall-mounted bracket via flexible tubes; one or both can be placed directly on the countertop for cooking. Since heat is generated, through magnetic induction, by the cookware itself, there is little risk of burning either skin or counter surface. When not in use, the copper-ringed elements and oak temperature-control panel look more like artwork than appliance. fabita.it,  adrianodesign.it 

AZURE is an independent magazine working to bring you the best in design, architecture and interiors. We rely on advertising revenue to support the creative content on our site. Please consider whitelisting our site in your settings, or pausing your adblocker while stopping by.