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It’s time for a reboot. That’s the consensus as the world continues to grapple with the ongoing consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic, which has prompted a re-evaluation of architecture and design standards and the embracing of fresh paradigms to address future needs.

To those ends, we’ve canvassed a who’s who of industry experts in the September issue of Azure, distilling their takes on what’s next for workspaces, schools, airports and more. Among the highlights: visionary thinker Carlo Ratti muses on the potential resurgence of suburbia, acclaimed interior designer Adam Tihany offers unique hospitality solutions, Talitha Liu and Lexi Tsien of the New York studio Soft-Firm ponder the future of offices, and Canadian architect Paul Sapounzi reveals how to make schools more versatile.

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Our featured interiors are equally forward-looking: Outside Quito, Ecuador, for example, Diez + Muller’s multi-use live-work complex fosters a strong connection to nature while showcasing the benefits of working close to home. A satellite office by the multidisciplinary Toronto studio UUfie for a Japanese tech firm, meanwhile, combines high function with bold details to eye-catching effect. And a Mexican residence by Brooklyn- and Tijuana-based Studiohuerta serves as a model of both austere beauty and progressive building practices.

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Plus, architect Rand Elliot realizes an evocative new arts venue in Oklahoma City, Note Design Studio revives both a heritage building and the Swedish Grace aesthetic to create a co-working space in London, and the creatives behind Spanish studio MUT Design discuss the benefits of staying small.

ALSO IN THIS ISSUE

Trendspotting

Highlights from 2020’s best (virtual) product launches, including earthy reds from Milan, ribbed forms in New York City and soft looks via NeoCon

Landscape
Jiangyin Greenway pathway with structure overtop

BAU’s elevated pedestrian pathway in the Chinese port of Jiangyin evokes the Yangtze River in concrete and steel

Double Spotlight: Facades and Kitchens

Fresh ideas for exteriors, from stone-look finishes and pretty PVC to circadian curtain walls

Customization goes big in kitchens, with adaptable systems, flexible appliances and more

Out Now: The Workspace Issue

From a striking live-work complex in South America to a Japanese tech firm’s satellite in Toronto, Azure’s September issue explores the modern workplace — and how it and other typologies will adapt to COVID-19.

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