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Working at the intersection of architecture and medicine, Dr. Diana Anderson — both a healthcare architect and a board-certified internist — has a unique perspective on how buildings can influence healing and well-being for both patients and healthcare providers. Founder of Dochitect, a collaborative model for approaching healthcare design from both fields simultaneously, Canada-born, California-based Anderson champions a refocusing of the built environment from being mere backdrops for medical encounters and toward settings that are humanistic and solution-based. Here, she shares insights on how architecture can promote healing.

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Take cues from domestic architecture

Design can be an important tool in care...

How This Architect Turned Doctor Designs for Healing

Prescriptions for creating
restorative spaces from “dochitect” Diana Anderson include residential inspiration, limiting hierarchies and nurturing well-being for staff and patients alike.

AZURE is an independent magazine working to bring you the best in design, architecture and interiors. We rely on advertising revenue to support the creative content on our site. Please consider whitelisting our site in your settings, or pausing your adblocker while stopping by.